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Archive for the ‘3D production’ Category

3D Content Hub is proud to be a sponsor again at this years’ 3DFF. We are also participating with several shortfilms in the festival competition. More infos on the official website, the official 3DFF Final Program Guide v5 2013 (download pdf) or in the press announcement below:3d-Week-Facebook-Banner.00116TH ANNUAL 3D FILM FESTIVAL OPENS WITH INTERNATIONAL 3D SHORT FILM COMPETITION AND CLOSES WITH LOS ANGELES PREMIERE OF DARIO ARGENTO’S DRACULA 3D

3D FILM FESTIVAL RUNS AS PART OF THE 3D WEEK IN AMERICA CAMPAIGN HELD IN PARTNERSHIP WITH WORLD 3-D FILM EXPO III AND THE INTERNATIONAL 3D & ADVANCED IMAGING SOCIETY

PRESENTED BY 3OPOLIS

SPONSORED BY REALD, DLP and NVIDIA

SEPTEMBER 19 -21, 2013

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Today we present an exclusive interview with Leon Tan, producer of War of the Worlds: Goliath,  an award winning stereoscopic 3D animation feature.

War of the Worlds Goliath 3D Poster

1. Tell us how you got the idea to make this movie?
It all started from an idea by Joe Pearson, a Los Angeles-based animation producer and director, who had a concept for an animated TV series entitled “War of the Worlds: ARES” in the 1990s.
I met Joe in a bus in Tokyo in late-2006, during the Tokyo International Film Festival, and after he returned to Los Angeles and I to Kuala Lumpur, we kept in touch and he shared his many animation project ideas with me and the one that stood out was “War of the Worlds: ARES”.
By July 2007, Joe and I had formed a Malaysian company called Tripod Entertainment Sdn Bhd, together with New Zealander Mike Bloemendal whom I had already partnered with at Imaginex Studios, an audio post-production house also based in Malaysia.WaroftheWorldsGoliath - Still01_1

Tripod was fully-funded by MAVCAP, the Malaysian government’s venture capital firm. MAVCAP’s endorsement and investment was key to greenlighting Tripod’s production of “War of the Worlds: Goliath” (of which “ARES” was now called), which had by now shifted focus from a TV series to an animated feature film. 

Soon, other Malaysian government agencies and funds supported “Goliath”, including the Multimedia Development Corporation (MDeC), National Film Development Corporation Malaysia (FINAS) and Bank Simpanan Nasional. 


It’s not so much a sequel to the original HG Wells’ book as it is a “what if” scenario:  What if HG Wells’ book was really an eye witness’ journal of a historical global Martian invasion in 1899?  It’s just one man’s story, in an event that would have millions of stories to tell from perspectives all over the world experiencing the invasion.  By then, we got Kevin Eastman, the co-creator of the “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” and owner/publisher of “Heavy Metal” magazine on board as Executive Producer, and David Abramowitz, the creative mind behind the acclaimed “Highlander” TV series, as a producer and writer of the script. Joe helmed the movie as director.  And so it began.

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The Graphics & Media Lab CMC of Lomonosov Moscow State University has about 10 years’ experience in comprehensive analyzing of compressed video. Recently the Graphics & Media Lab (further: the Lab) has published its first detailed report on Stereo-Film-Quality Analysis within VQMT3D (Video Quality Measurement Tool for 3D) Project. Meanwhile the Lab is working on the next four reports on stereoscopic video quality estimation. They are expected to be made public in the second half of 2013.

Stereo and multiview video entertainment has become a very popular trend. A rapidly growing demand for 3D films after Avatar release inspired the production houses to create a lot of new stereo content. But sometimes doing fast doesn’t mean doing it well enough. Insufficient stereo video quality provoked in the audience such ‘special effects’ as eyestrain and headache after visiting 3D cinemas. The Lab decided to analyze five stereo films, captured with stereoscopic camera systems and to investigate the reasons of the irritating annoyance. Finding just a set of bad frames is rather a simple task, but it is not a useful result for a comparative analysis. For achieving a valuable result it’s important to estimate a ratio of bad and well-done frames in a movie. Such results enable finding the worst frames in one movie or comparing different films.  For the purpose of revealing stereoscopic errors the Lab developed a unique tool for stereo video quality measurement (VQMT3D). Its algorithms are able to discover the key reasons of visual discomfort from 3D films viewing:

1. horizontal disparity

2. vertical disparity

3. color mismatch

4. sharpness mismatch

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Press Release:

From before the release of AVATAR up until the release of MAN OF STEEL, the questions surrounding 3D have for the most part, been answered.

Will AVATAR be successful, in 3D. No question about it. Will 3D become a creative tool used by top flight directors? Ask Martin Scorcese, Baz Lurhman, M Knight Shyamalan and the many others. Will television display makers add 3D as a built in feature in new sets? That answer is in and 3D is a part of virtually every new set available.

There are still questions about the growth of 3D. Will sports continue to be broadcast in 3D, will prime time television be offered in 3D, will 3D glasses become a thing of the past? Time will answer these questions but the basic question of the viability and sustainability of 3D has been answered and is no longer challenged.

We have been an advocate and a supporter of 3D from its very formative stages and have attempted to answer all 3D related questions as the technology evolved. For now, we feel there is little more we can do in the context of a two or three day conference to advance the knowledge beyond what it is so we have decided to postpone the 3D Entertainment Summit past 2013.

As with all technologies when new ones enter a market they are disruptive yet opportunistic as well. There will be new ones, we will be on the lookout for them and when the next generation of story telling is affected by technology and creates more questions than answers we will return with our conference team to endeavor to activate discussion and seek answers.

For now we want to thank our sponsors, supporters, speakers and attendees. We wish you all the very best and hope 3D has become a new area of success for you and we look forward to working with you again, down the road.

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Just a quick note on the ESPN 3D news today and my take on why the channel failed:
1) Marketsize: There aren’t enough 3DTV’s in the market yet. Broadcast, by definition, means that you have to reach a large audience in order to make economic sense. So, unfortunately ESPN was a few years too early. The action for 3D content is in Home Video and VOD as the dealflow of 3DContentHub shows.
2) Sports Rights: the nature of sports rights and sports franchises is such that it is almost impossible to own multi territory rights. Hence ESPN couldn’t sell their 3D assets overseas to the countries where 3D is performing better than in the USA. And they were also prevented to license their content to global customers such as VOD platforms or hardware makers.
3) Shelf Life: I wrote in January 2012 “most sport events lose their entire commercial value after the initial live broadcast.”  So, to have a channel with sports events is not necessarily the right “genre” as you have to re-run a lot of content during the day. And re-runs of live sports events isn’t so attractive to viewers.
4) High Costs:  Sports events require multiple cameras and in many cases two separate production crews (2D and 3D). This is (too) costly, especially if the addressable market of 3D TVs is still so small.
5) 3D Technology: we also have  to see the bigger picture and admit that the current 3D technology is not offering an enjoyable consumer experience and may not indeed be ready for the mainstream yet. 3D has not been as popular with the general public and the industry could potentially be making the same mistakes with 4k again. Here is me tackling the question “Is 3D Dead?

As I wrote last week and have spoken about on many occasions, it is important to point out that it is not (the current) 3D or 4k what matters; In the future we will have ultra high definition screens and glasses-free 3D. Auto stereoscopic displays is where this is all going. So building 3D skills and 4k capabilities is a wise strategy for broadcasters and producers alike. Let me know your thoughts. 3D HFR 3D

 

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Aloft 3DSince January 4k (or UHD) has been in the press and many have celebrated the apparent “Death of 3D” *. An increasing number of producers, media executives and consumers have asked me about my opinion, so let me list what I think are the most interesting aspects of 4k and let me elaborate on what 4k means for the 3D industry. (I have linked to many related articles in this blogpost and we have included some stills from our 4k films).

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Oz the Great and the Powerful by Dr Miriam Ross

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The first striking aspect of Oz the Great and the Powerful (2013) is that its opening images are in both black and white and the 4:3 aspect ratio that was common to Classical Hollywood cinema but rarely seen nowadays. Although anyone who has seen the trailers for this film will know to expect the black and white 4:3, there is still the uncanny feeling that the image is curtailed. This is made all the more obvious after the opening credits when we see the circus where central character Oscar/Oz is based. A fire-eater blows a large arc of flames across the border of the frame, which also comes slightly out towards the audience in stereoscopic depth. In a similar action, a dove flutters beyond the confines of the image. The overt and ostentatious display of how the film can play with its own borders recalls early cinema that operated as an attraction concerned with demonstrating its magical trickery. This delight in optical illusions is made clear within the film through the depiction of cinematic toys such as the zoetrope and a (albeit improbable) modified praxinoscope. The link to early cinema is similar to the one made in Martin Scorsese’s Hugo (2011) when the spectacular imaging of stereoscopic film was used to revitalise knowledge of film pioneer Georges Méliès’ magic effects in early French cinema. As a truly US production, Oz the Great and the Powerful, makes reference not to Méliès but to the American cinema and technology inventor Thomas Edison. Oscar speaks of his clear admiration for the inventor and the final battle in the film depends upon mechanical trickery inspired by the inventor.

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